Nonfiction Book Reviews

The Internet Writing Journal

Page Two of Four

Gender Sell by Judith C. Tingley, Ph.D., & Lee E. Robert

Simon and Schuster, April 1999.
Hardcover, 174 pages.
ISBN: 0684843854.
Ordering information:
Amazon.com.


Gender Sell
by Judith C. Tingley, Ph.D., & Lee E. Robert Whether or not one's profession is specifically linked to selling, selling arises in almost every life situation. Everyone is a salesperson many times during the day. Therefore it only seems rational that a book addressed to selling to the opposite sex should be read by all of us, regardless of our particular way of making a living. For this reason, Gender Sell will be extremely useful to all readers. Based on solid scientific studies related to sales, Gender Sell gives specific approaches to approaching the opposite sex in a sales situation and walks the salesperson through "reprogramming" to change previous mistakes into successes.

In the chapter entitled "Men Influencing Women" we find out that whereas a males salesperson in customarily told to be specific and knowledgeable about the product, female customers often interpret this as being high pressure and domineering. Men wishing to sell to women need to go slowly, increase "active listening", and ask more questions while telling less. They are advised to increase the use of feeling words. All of this, of course, can be summed up as giving respect to the woman client while never being condescending. Women, on the other hand are advised to take a confident tone, use sports references and stay with the facts. They are told to know the product or service well, but keep the emotional intensity low.

There is no doubt that gender enters in to the sales relationship in many subtle ways, and those who become successful at selling and influencing others will be greatly rewarded by mastering the techniques of this helpful guide.

--Sarah Reaves White


How Babies Talk: The Magic and Mystery of Language in the First Three Years of Life by Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Ph.D. and Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Ph.D.

Dutton, May, 1999.
Hardcover, 256 pages.
ISBN: 0525944559.
Ordering information:
Amazon.com.


How Babies Talk: The Magic and Mystery of
Language in the First Three Years of Life
by Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Ph.D. and Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Ph.D. How Babies Talk is a fascinating study that puts the latest discoveries from the Infant Language Laboratory of Temple University and the Infant Language Project at the University of Delaware into the hands of parents everywhere. Written in an easy style and organized in a usable form, this highly useful book belongs in nurseries everywhere.

In the introduction the background of our knowledge of language growth is summarized, and the reader is brought up to date on the importance of this new field of study of the development of the very young. Then the first chapter actually discusses the language experiences of the child who is still in the womb and gives suggestions on early stimulation and interaction. Next, the auditory and verbal environment of the infant is addressed. Equipped with the very latest research on what the best environment for the very young is, the new parent can enter into the child's world with confidence that what is being done will insure the best foundation the child could possibly have.

Each chapter covers a new stage of development from four months of age to thirty-six months. First the stage of development is discussed and then questions that may arise are answered. Difficulties are also addressed, such as "When should you worry?" and "It's never too early to start learning a second language." Questions that have always troubled parents are answered with up to the minute research and experience. Then, at the end of each chapter, is a feature entitled "Try This:" that will involve the parent with the child in an interactive activity.

How Babies Talk is a book that parents have needed for a very long time, and it will answer more questions than most of us have thought to ask. It belongs in every home where young children are growing up.

--Sarah Reaves White


Nonfiction Reviews
Page One | Page Two | Page Three | Page Four

Return to Book Reviews Index