Tom Hanks Urges Corporate Bosses to Get Back to Negotiating

Posted on January 10, 2008

Now that the Golden Globes has been scrapped for a boring newscast of who won (no red carpet, no fun) the Oscars are the latest telecast that is in danger from the continued writers' strike. Now Tom Hanks is asking the parties to negotiate to save the Oscars which is scheduled for February 24, 2008.
"The show must go on, that is one of the tenets of everything," Hanks told Reuters in London. "I am a member of the board of governors of the Academy, and we definitely want to put on a great show and honor the films that have come out in the course of the year," he said on the red carpet at the premiere of his film "Charlie Wilson's War."

Hanks said corporate bosses should remember that many people, from carpenters to caterers, were suffering as a result of the strike by about 10,500 Writers Guild of America members over their dispute with major film and TV studios. "There are caterers and carpenters ... and electricians and gaffers," the 51-year-old said. "There are a lot of people out there associated with the industry, for whom the sooner this work stoppage is over the better. "I just hope that the big guys who make big decisions up high in their corporate boardrooms and what not get down to honest bargaining and everyone can get back to work."

The star of box office hits "Forrest Gump" and "The Da Vinci Code," and twice a best actor Oscar winner, added that a shift in the way screenwriters were rewarded for their work was needed in the Internet age. "The delivery systems, the revenue streams, just the very presentation media is now going to be a brand new place," he said in a brief interview on Thursday.
February 24th isn't that far away and there are no talks scheduled. So it's possible that there won't be any televised Oscars this year.

More from Writers Write


  • Henry Holt Rushes Fire and Fury Into Bookstores After Trump Legal Threat


  • Why Is A Raven Like A Writing Desk?


  • George Saunders Wins 2017 Man Booker Prize