New Version of Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code Being Released for Young Adults

Posted on May 18, 2016

The Da Vinci Code for Young Adults

Random House just announced that it will publish a young adult adaptation of Dan Brown's bestselling novel The Da Vinci Code. The book will be released in hardcover and ebook on September 13, 2016 in the U.S. by Delacorte Press and on September 8, 2016 in the United Kingdom by Penguin. Beverly Horowitz, the publisher of Delacorte Press, and Shannon Cullen, the publishing director of Penguin Random House Children’s UK are will oversee the editing of the book for a young adult audience.

The book is being released just before the film adaptation of Dan Brown's Inferno starring Tom Hanks hits theaters. The original Da Vinci Code novel hit stores in 2003 and became a global phenomenon, selling 82 million copies. The new version keeps the plot intact, but reportedly changes a few scenes that made the book unsuitable for young adults. Although judging from the eruption the announcement generated on Twitter, quite a few teens and pre-teens read the original, unabridged version when it came out. The new version is getting a new cover and is aimed at a new generation of young readers who missed the Da Vinci Code phenomenon.

Dan Brown issued a statement about the new release saying, "My parents were educators, and so it’s no surprise that I have a fascination with history and research. In fact, if I weren't an author, I’m sure I would be a teacher myself. It is my sincere hope that this adaptation of The Da Vinci Code sparks in young adults the same thrill of discovery that I feel while exploring hidden history and the mysteries of the world we live in."

In case you have been living in a cave for the last decade or so, the book follows the adventures of brilliant symbologist Robert Langdon and cryptographer Sophie Neveu. The two are on the trail of a conspiracy by the Catholic Church which if uncovered will have vast repercussions for millions of believers. The book is a real page turner, combining Brown's excellent research skills, his love of puzzles and codes, and fast paced action. The book generated quite a bit of controversy and was widely denounced by the Vatican which ordered Catholics not to read it. That, of course, only made the book more popular.

Photo: Delacorte Press

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