Computer Book Reviews

The Internet Writing Journal, February 2000
Page One of Two

DocBook: The Definitive Guide by Norman Walsh & Leonard Muellner

O'Reilly, October 1999.
Trade Paperback, 633 pages.
ISBN: 1565925807
Ordering information:
Amazon.com. | Amazon.co.uk


DocBook: The Definitive Guide
by Norman Walsh & Leonard Muellner DocBook is a system for writing structured documents using SGML and XML. A number of computer companies use DocBook for their documentation, as do several Open Source documentation groups, including the Linux Documentation Project (LDP). The book provides an introduction to SGML and XML, a guide to creating documents with the DocBook DTD, instruction for customizing DocBook, parsing DocBook documents, a guide to publishing DocBook documents in print and on the Web, and a complete DocBook element reference section. The DocBook element reference section, which makes up the core of the book, lists every DocBook element complete with descriptions, attributes and examples. The book also includes lists of DocBook resources, a quick reference table and a glossary. The CD-ROM includes the entire text from the book, examples, DSSSL stylesheets, DocBook DTDs for SGML and XML and third-party software. This is an excellent reference for those using the DocBook DTD for print or online documentation or publishing; some prior knowledge of SGML or XML is suggested.


Javascript Application Cookbook by Jerry Bradenbaugh

O'Reilly, October 1999.
Trade Paperback, 462 pages.
ISBN: 1565925777
Ordering information:
Amazon.com. | Amazon.co.uk


Javascript Application Cookbook
by Jerry Bradenbaugh This reference provides actual JavaScript Applications to allow readers to improve their websites and learn more about JavaScript coding in the process. Some of the scripts featured in the book include: a client-side search engine, an email greetings application, a JavaScript rollover tool, a client-side shopping cart, an online test application, an interactive slideshow and an application for cookie-based user preferences. The code for each application can also be obtained from the publisher's website so it does not have to be retyped. The coding for each application is explained in detail to help the reader understand the program and learn more about JavaScript coding. The appendix in the book provides a reference to JavaScript objects and methods and a directory of websites that contain scripts, code and tips. The JavaScript Application Cookbook is a both a valuable learning tool and a quick way to update your website with new JavaScript programs.


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